ibuprofen

Is paracetamol as effective as indomethacin or ibuprofen in closing a hemodynamically significant patent ductus arteriosus in preterm infants?

PDA Indomethacin and Ibuprofen, two effective and commonly-used treatments for hemodynamically significant patent ductus arteriosus (hs-PDA), are associated with adverse clinical events, poor neurodevelopmental outcome, and BPD. This trial assessed the effectiveness of paracetamol as an alternative to indomethacin or ibuprofen in closing a hs-PDA in neonates born at <28 weeks gestation or <1500 grams, and found that paracetamol is equally as effective in inducing PDA closure and was associated with fewer GI bleeding events and renal effects. This EBNEO review comments on the role of CONSORT reporting guidelines in interpreting the results of RCTs.

Oral paracetamol or oral ibuprofen to close the ductus arteriosus: both “work,” but do we know when to use them?

Patent Ductus Arteriosus PDA is a common and severe morbidity among preterm neonates, and current treatment options are limited. This randomized controlled trial assessed the effectiveness of paracetamol in inducing closure of a hemodynamically significant PDA as compared to ibuprofen. The investigators concluded that paracetamol was equally as effective as ibuprofen for PDA closure; however, given the power of the study is limited by the size of trial, significant further study is necessary to determine the true efficacy and safety of paracetamol as a treatment for PDA.