Latest Updates

Does Using a Nasal Barrier Dressing Prevent Nasal Injury in Premature Infants Receiving Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure?

Nasal CPAP Non-invasive ventilation is essential in the NICU, but is commonly associated with nasal injury. This prospective trial assessed the usefulness of nasal barrier dressings in preventing nasal injury in neonates <30 weeks' gestational age receiving NCPAP. Although there were significant limitations to the study, nasal barrier dressings significantly reduced the both the occurrence and degree of nasal injury.

Does tight glycemic control with insulin therapy in the early neonatal period improve long-term outcomes?

HYPERGLYCEMIA Hyperglycemia commonly complicates the clinical course of premature infants, but data regarding the safety and efficacy of insulin therapy are mixed. This randomized controlled trial assessed the effectiveness of blood glucose maintenance with insulin therapy among VLBW infants with hyperglycemia. The study’s two year followup data indicate that “tight” glycemic control with immediate initiation of insulin therapy and targeting lower blood glucose concentrations did not improve neurodevelopmental outcome compared to standard insulin therapy, although height, lean body mass, and fasting blood glucose differed between the two groups. Additional followup is required to determine whether early insulin therapy is appropriate for management of neonatal hyperglycemia.

Is paracetamol as effective as indomethacin or ibuprofen in closing a hemodynamically significant patent ductus arteriosus in preterm infants?

PDA Indomethacin and Ibuprofen, two effective and commonly-used treatments for hemodynamically significant patent ductus arteriosus (hs-PDA), are associated with adverse clinical events, poor neurodevelopmental outcome, and BPD. This trial assessed the effectiveness of paracetamol as an alternative to indomethacin or ibuprofen in closing a hs-PDA in neonates born at <28 weeks gestation or <1500 grams, and found that paracetamol is equally as effective in inducing PDA closure and was associated with fewer GI bleeding events and renal effects. This EBNEO review comments on the role of CONSORT reporting guidelines in interpreting the results of RCTs.

Membership

Membership

We welcome individuals and institutions around the world to sign up for EBNEO membership. Membership allows you to: log in and post comments on all News and Reviews receive our monthly newsletters – curated content from the newly published neonatal clinical research literature helps you stay up-to-date learn about conferences and educational activities before information…

Read more

About

About

The International Society for Evidence-Based Neonatology (EBNEO) is a non-profit organisation that nourishes a vision that all neonatal care should be firmly built on best available evidence. The vision includes as short a passage from research-based knowledge to implementation in neonatal care (translation), thereby improving survival, decreasing morbidities and promoting long-lasting health for newborn infants. Memberships are open for individuals and institutions from all around the world.

Read more