CUS

Preterm Neuroimaging and School-Age Cognitive Outcomes

PRETERM NEUROIMAGING The prediction of neurodevelopmental outcomes among infants born at <28 weeks' gestational age is challenging and inexact. This prospective study assessed the usefulness of near-term neuroimaging in predicting the development of poor neurodevelopmental outcomes among these infants and found that at school age, there was a consistent association between near-term adverse cranial ultrasound findings (35-42 weeks' gestational age) and cognitive impairment compared to early CUS (4-14 days of age) or MRI. Thus, near-term cranial ultrasound may be a useful predictor of neurodevelopmental outcome in infants born at <28 weeks' gestational age.

Late Neuroimaging Predicts Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Preterm Infants

NEUROIMAGING Much effort has been devoted to developing accurate neurodevelopmental prognostic assessments for extremely preterm neonates. This prospective cohort study compared different types and timing of neuroimaging with accurate predictions of poor neurodevelopmental outcome or death in neonates born at 24-27 weeks’ gestational age, and found that cranial ultrasound performed at 35-42 weeks postmenstrual age was more accurate than CUS performed at 4-14 days of life and comparable to MRI at 35-42 weeks PMA for predicting neurodevelopmental impairment. Although significant additional follow-up study is needed, CUS performed at near-term corrected gestational age may be a useful prognostic tool for neurodevelopmental outcome in extremely preterm neonates